Back to Artists«

Alma Thomas (1891-1978)


5 of 7

Yellow and Blue, 1959
oil on canvas
28" x 40", signed and dated

March on Washington, 1964
acrylic on canvas
31 x 39 inches, signed and dated

Azaleas in Spring, 1968
acrylic on canvas
20" x 24", signed and dated

Apollo 12 "Splash Down", 1970
acrylic and graphite on canvas
50 1/4" x 50 1/4", signed and dated

Lake Reflecting Advent of Spring, 1973
acrylic on canvas
45 1/4" x 45", signed and dated

Oriental Sunset, 1973
acrylic on canvas
72" x 52 1/8", signed and dated

Red Scarlet Sage, 1976
acrylic on canvas
46" x 36", signed

 


Exhibitions

1of


New & Noteworthy

Tang Teaching Museum poster 2016

Download PDF

Antiques and The Arts Weekly, February 5, 2016

Download PDF

Art in America, February 2016

Download PDF

Hyperallergic, October 13, 2012

by Thomas Micchelli

Download PDF

The New York Times, October 11, 2009

by Holland Cotter

Download PDF

Apollo Magazine, March 2005

by Susannah Wollmer

Download PDF

New York Magazine, February 21, 2005

edited by Karen Rosenberg

Download PDF

The New York Times, January 21, 2005

by Grace Glueck

Download PDF

The New York Times, October 12, 2001

by Grace Glueck

Download PDF

The New York Times, October 5, 2001

by Grace Glueck

Download PDF

The New York Times, May 4, 1972

by David L. Shirey

Download PDF

1of


Prints & Publications


Artist Information

ALMA THOMAS
February 6 - June 5, 2016
Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College
Saratoga Springs, NY
tang.skidmore.edu

traveling to The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY
July 13 - October 23, 2016
www.studiomuseum.org

“Creative art is for all time, and is therefore independent of time. It is of all ages, of every land, and if by this we mean that the creative spirit in man which produces a picture or a statue is common to the whole civilized world, independent of age, race and nationality, the statement may stand unchallenged.”[1]

Known for her large-scale abstract paintings comprised of rhythmic marks of exuberant color, Alma Thomas was born in Columbus, Georgia in 1891. Her parents, John Harris and Amelia Canty Thomas, were both teachers, and Alma Thomas and her three younger sisters grew up around the educated adults their parents often entertained, including Booker T. Washington. In 1907, the family moved north to escape the rise of violence against black Americans in Georgia and settled in Washington, DC, in part because of the excellence of its schools at the time. Thomas attended the Armstrong Manual Training High School and, from 1911 to 1913, the Miner Normal School for teacher training. She finished with a certificate to teach kindergarten and took a job in Delaware. In 1921, Thomas returned to DC and enrolled in courses at Howard University, studying home economics with the intent of becoming a costume designer. When James Herring founded the art department at Howard in 1922, Thomas became its first major; two years later, she was also the first to graduate with a BS in fine arts. From 1930 to 1934, Thomas took summer classes at Columbia University Teachers College, earning her master’s in art education. Throughout the 1930s, she continued to work in education and organize community art programs such as the Marionette Club, the School Arts League, and the Junior High School Arts Club. In 1943, Herring and Alonzo Aden founded the Barnett Aden Gallery, and Thomas became its vice president. Dedicated to avant-garde art, Barnett Aden was the first gallery in the nation’s segregated capital to exhibit work by both black and white artists. In the late 1940s, Thomas became one of the DC-area artists and art teachers affiliated with the “Little Paris Studio,” a collective started by Lois Mailou Jones and Céline Tabary that met weekly and organized annual exhibitions. The group became an important venue for African American artists at the time.[2]

In the 1950s, Thomas started to develop the method and style that has earned her a place among the most innovative American painters of the twentieth century. She embarked on a decade-long formal study of art at American University with painter Jacob Kainen. Departing from realism, Thomas loosened up her brushwork and began to focus more intently on fields of color. By the late 1950s, she found her voice in abstraction, patterning geometric shapes in rich colors against solid backgrounds. In 1960, at the age of sixty-nine, Thomas retired from teaching to devote her time exclusively to art. That same year, she had her first solo exhibition, at the Dupont Theatre Art Gallery. In 1963, her work was shown in New York City for the first time, at the Artists for CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) exhibition, mounted by the prestigious Martha Jackson Gallery. In 1972, Thomas was given two major solo exhibitions—Alma Thomas at the Whitney Museum and Alma W. Thomas: A Retrospective at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, DC. With Alma Thomas, she became the first African American woman given a one-person show at the Whitney. That same year, the mayor of DC, Walter Washington, declared September 9 to be Alma Thomas Day, and in celebration, local TV and radio stations aired programs about her life and work. She continued to exhibit in group and solo shows throughout the remainder of the decade, and in 1977, her work was included in the Corcoran’s 35th Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting.

The monumental canvases Thomas created in the 1960s and 1970s were informed by the local abstract movement in DC known as the Washington Color School, which included Morris Louis, Sam Gilliam, and Kenneth Noland. However, her interest in color experimentation aligned her more closely to Josef Albers, Johannes Itten, and Wassily Kandinsky. Inspired by nature, recent discoveries in the sciences, and her own observations of earthly and celestial phenomena, Thomas’s work was devoid of overt political content. Her dedication to abstraction reflected her belief that modern art at its best could transcend political and historical concerns. But her preference for abstract, joyously expressionistic, gestural strokes of vibrant color was not accompanied by a retreat from historical and social realities. The level of Thomas’s success in the 1960s and 1970s meant that she could devote herself exclusively to painting, but she continued to be a passionate advocate of arts education for underserved communities. In addition to her involvement with Artists for CORE, Thomas organized art programs and taught art classes to local youth. In 1975, Howard University honored her with its Alumni of Achievement Award, a recognition of her importance to both the history of art and the local African American communities touched by her considerable talent and dedication as an artist and a teacher.


For over twenty five years, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery has championed the work of Alma Thomas, mounting two solo exhibitions: Alma Thomas: Phantasmagoria, Major Paintings from the 1970s (2001) and Alma Thomas: Moving Heaven & Earth, Paintings and Works on Paper, 1958-1978 (2015). Her work has been acquired by some of the most prominent American institutions, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Philadelphia Museum, Smithsonian American Art Museum, The White House Historical Association and the Whitney Museum of American Art. A major retrospective for the artist has been co-organized by The Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College and The Studio Museum in Harlem, curated by Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Museum and Lauren Haynes, Associate Curator, Permanent Collection of the Studio Museum. Featuring 18 paintings and 27 works on paper, the show is currently on view in Sarasota Springs before opening in Harlem on July 14, 2016. A major catalogue will accompany the exhibition with extensive images and new essays on Thomas's important work and influential legacy.



[1] Alma Thomas, quoted in HE Mahal, “Interviews: Four Afro-American Artists—Approaches to Inhumanity,’ Art Gallery 13:7 (April 1970): 36, quoted in Jonathan Binstock, “Apolitical Art in a Political World: Alma Thomas in the Late 1960s and Early 1970s,” Alma W. Thomas: A Retrospective of the Paintings (Fort Wayne, Indiana: Fort Wayne Museum of Art, with Pomegranate Communications, 1998), exhibition catalog, 63.

[2] Tritobia Benjamin.: The Life and Art of Lois Mailou Jones (New York: Pomegranate Press, 1994), 49. Cited in Catherine Bernard, “Patterns of Change: The Work of Lois Mailou Jones,” 2002, Anyone Can Fly Foundation website. http://www.anyonecanflyfoundation.org/library/Bernard_on_Mailou_Jones_essay.html#22 (Accessed October 2012).

 

1911-13      
Miner Teacher’s School, Washington, DC

1921-24       
B.S. Howard University, Washington, DC

1930-34       
M.A. Teacher’s College, Columbia University, NY

SELECTED MUSEUM COLLECTIONS

African-American Museum, Philadelphia, PA
Akron Art Museum, Akron, OH
The Anacostia Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
The Art Gallery, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD
Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME
The Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
California African American Museum, Los Angeles, CA
Carl Van Vechten Gallery of Fine Arts, Fisk University, Nashville, TN
Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, ME
Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR
David C. Driskell Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI
Dimock Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, DC
Fort Wayne Museum of Fine Arts, Fort Wayne, IN
H.C. Taylor Art Gallery, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC
Heckscher Museum of Art, Huntington, NY
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
LaSalle University Art Museum, Philadelphia, PA
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
The Museum of African American Art, Tampa, FL
National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC
New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ
New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA
The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York, NY
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC
Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL
Tougaloo Art Collections, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS
University of Iowa Museum of Art, Iowa City, IO
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT
The Watkins Collection, American University, Washington, DC
The White House Historical Association, Washington, DC
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

 

1958
College Art Traveling Service, Washington, DC
Watkins Gallery, American University, Washington, DC

1959
Bennett College, Greensboro, NC

1960
Watercolors by Alma Thomas, Dupont Theatre Art Gallery, Washington, DC; 1961, 62

1966
Alma Thomas: A Retrospective Exhibition (1959-1966), Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; 1975

1967
Margaret Dickey Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

1968
Alma Thomas: Recent Paintings, Franz Bader Gallery, Washington, DC; 1970, 74

1971  
Recent Paintings by Alma W. Thomas: Earth and Space Series, 1961-1971, Carl Van Vechten Gallery of Fine Arts, Fisk University, Nashville, TN

1972   
Alma W. Thomas, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Alma W. Thomas: Retrospective Exhibition, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

1973   
Alma W. Thomas: Paintings, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY

1976
Alma W. Thomas: Recent Paintings, H.C. Taylor Art Gallery, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC
Alma W. Thomas: Recent Paintings, 1975-1976, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY

1981
A Life in Art: Alma Thomas, 1891-1978, National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

1998
Alma W. Thomas: A Retrospective of the Paintings, Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN; Tampa Museum of Art, Tampa, FL, New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ, Anacostia Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; The Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA 

2001
Alma Thomas: Phantasmagoria, Major Paintings, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY; Women’s Museum; An Institute for the Future, Dallas, TX

2015
Alma Thomas: Moving Heaven & Earth, Paintings and Works on Paper, 1958-1978, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY

2016
Alma Thomas, Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery, Saratoga Springs, NY; The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY

1951
Inspiration House, Washington, DC

1952
8th Annual Exhibition of Paintings, Sculptures and Prints by Negro Artists, Trevor Arnett Library,
Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA; 1954, 64, 70

1953
Dupont Theatre Art Gallery, Washington, DC; 1960

1954
Six Washington Painters, Barnett-Arden Gallery, Washington, DC; 1956, 57, 59, 60
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; 1955, 60

1955
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; 1956, 59, 77

1958
Contemporary American Paintings, College Arts Traveling Service, Washington, DC
Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; 1959, 60, 63, 66

1959
American University, Washington, DC

1960
American Federation of the Arts, Washington, DC

1961
U.S. National Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; 1962, 63
New Vistas in American Art, Howard University Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

1963
CORE, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, NY
Margaret Dickey Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

1967
Hampton University Institute, Hampton, VA
American Austrian Cultural Society, Washington, DC

1968
Encounters: An Exhibit in Celebration of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Bi-Centennial, James B. Duke Library, Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC
Dimock Gallery, George Washington University, Washington, DC
Anacostia Neighborhood Museum, Washington, DC; 1970, 75
The Art Club of Washington, Washington, DC; 1972

1969
Arts and Industries Building, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Johns and Marble Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota, FL
Lee Nordness Gallery, New York, NY

1970
Dimensions of Black, La Jolla Museum of Art, La Jolla, CA
UNCF, Equal Opportunity Building, New York, NY
Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD
Afro-American Artists: New York and Boston, The Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Boston, MA; School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA

1971
Black American Artists/71, Lobby Gallery, Illinois Bell Telephone, Chicago, IL
Kalamazoo Institute of the Arts, Kalamazoo, MI
Contemporary Black Artists in America, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
The Art Barn, Washington, DC
Audubon Naturalist Society, Chevy Chase, MD

1972
Black Matri-Images: A Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings by Laura Wheeler Waring and Paintings and Prints by Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Jones, Alma W. Thomas, Morgan State College Gallery of Art, Baltimore, MD

1973
McNay Art Institute, San Antonio, TX

1974
Woman’s Work: American Art 1974, Museum of the Philadelphia Civic Center, Philadelphia, PA
Painting and Sculpture Today, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, IN; Contemporary Arts Center and Taft Museum, Cincinnati, OH
National Convention, American Institute of Architects, Washington, DC

1975
11 in New York, Women’s Interart Center Inc., New York, NY
Color and Image: Six Artists from Washington, DC, University of Iowa Museum of Art, Iowa City, IA
Afro-American Art, Carl Van Vechten Gallery of Fine Arts, Fisk University, Nashville, TN
The District Building, Washington, DC
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA
Contemporary Arts Gallery, New York University, New York, NY

1976
Two Centuries of Black American Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA; Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY
The Hue and Far Cry of Color: Contemporary “Mural” Size Paintings, Performing Arts Center, Fort Wayne, IN
Communication in Black Culture, American Telephone and Telegraph Company, New York, NY

1977
35th Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
Pattern, Grid and System Art, Wilson Gallery, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Summit Gallery, New York, NY
Pattern, Grid and System Art, Ralph Wilson Gallery, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

1979
Black Artists/South, Huntsville Museum of Art, Huntsville, AL
Reflections of a Southern Heritage: 20th Century Black Artists of the Southeast, Gibbes Art Gallery, Charleston, SC
Women Artists in Washington Collections, University of Maryland Art Gallery and Women’s Caucus for the Arts, College Park, MD

1980
Forever Free: Art by African-American Women, 1862-1980, Alexandria, VA

1981
Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NB

1983
Celebrating Contemporary American Black Artists, Fine Arts Museum of Long Island, Hempstead, NY
Six Washington Masters, Evan-Tibbs Collection, Washington, DC

1985
Since the Harlem Renaissance: 50 Years of Afro-American Art, Center Gallery of Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA
Art in Washington and Its Afro-American Presence, 1940-1970, Washington Projects for the Arts, Washington, DC

1986
Unbroken Circle: Exhibition of African-American Artists of the 1930s and 1940s, Kenkeleba House, New York, NY

1989
African-American Artists, 1880-1987: Selections from the Evan-Tibbs Collection, Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, Washington, DC

1990
Die Sammlung Hans und Hildi Muller und die Schenkung an das Bunder Kunstmuseum, Bunder Kunstmuseu, Chur, Switzerland

1991
The Search for Freedom: African American Abstract Painting, Kenkeleba House, New York, NY
The Walter O. Evans Collection of African American Art Traveling Exhibition, Beech Institute/King Tisdell Museum, Savannah, GA

1992
Free Within Ourselves: African-American Artists in the Collection of the National Museum of American Art, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT; IBM Gallery of Science and Art, New York, NY, Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, TN, Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA

1994
The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Collection of African American Art, San Antonio Museum of Art, San Antonio, TX; El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, TX; Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH; Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga, TN

1995
The Barnett-Aden Collection, The Museum of African American Art, Tampa, FL

1996
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, III, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY
Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African American Women Artists, ExhibitsUSA, Spelman College, Atlanta, GA; Polk Art Museum, Lakeland, FL; Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA; African American Museum, Dallas, TX; Minnesota Museum of American Art, St. Paul, MN; Kennedy Museum of American Art, Athens, OH; Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston, SC; Edwin A. Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita, KS; Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; Washington State University, Pullman, WA

1997
Revisiting American Art: Works from the Collections of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Katonah Museum of Art, Katonah, NY
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, IV, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY; Fisk University Galleries, Nashville, TN

1998
Tradition & Conflict: A Visual History of African-Americans in Art, 19th and Early 20th Centuries, Ledbetter Lusk Gallery, Memphis, TN

1999
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, VI, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY; Flint Institute of Arts, Flint, MI
To Conserve A Legacy: American Art from Historically Black Colleges and Universities, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, NY; Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, MA; The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Clark Atlanta University Art Galleries, Atlanta, GA; Fisk University with Tennessee State Museum, Nashville, TN; Hampton University Museum, Hampton, VA

2000
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, VII, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY; The Appleton Museum of Art, Florida State University, Ocala, FL
Michael Rosenfeld Gallery: The First Decade, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY

2001
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, VIII, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY; Texas Southern University Museum, Houston, TX
Abstraction on Paper: 1950-1965, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY

2002
In the Spirit of Martin: The Living Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Charles H. Wright Museum of African American Art, Detroit, MI; Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, DE; Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York, NY; Brooks Museum of Art, Memphis, TN; Montgomery Museum of Fine Art, Montgomery, AL
Free Expressions: Community Voices and Contemporary African American Art from the Collection, Newark Museum, Newark, NJ
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, IX, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY; Tubman African American Museum, Macon, GA

2003
Five African American Artists, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
African-American Art: 20th Century Masterworks, X, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY
African American Masters: Highlights of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, New York Historical
Society, New York, NY; Cheekwood Museum of Art, Nashville, TN; The Cummer Museum of Art, Jacksonville, FL; Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH; Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH; The Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, DE; Long Beach Museum of Art, Long Beach, CA; Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt Lake City, UT

2004
Mood Indigo: The Legacy of Duke Ellington – A Look at Jazz and Improvisation in American Art; Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY
Presence, Chelsea Art Museum, New York, NY
Recent Acquisitions, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME

2005
Stroke! Beauford Delaney, Norman Lewis & Alma Thomas, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY

2006
Pre – Post, Greenberg Van Doren Gallery, New York, NY
Lines of Discovery: 225 Years of American Drawings, The Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA; Gilcrease    Museum, Tulsa, OK; Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Kalamazoo, MI; Arkansas Arts Center, Little    Rock, AK

2007
Decoding Myth:  African American Abstraction, 1945-1975, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY

2008
African American Art:  200 Years, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY
Circa 1958:  Breaking Ground in American Art, Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Beyond the Canon: Small-Scale American Abstraction, 1945-1965, Robert Miller Gallery, New York, NY

2009
Abstract Expressionism: Further Evidence (Part One: Painting), Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY

2010
Color Balance: Paintings by Felrath Hines and Alma Thomas, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, NC

2011
Abstract Expressionism: Reloading the Canon, A Selection of Paintings and Sculpture, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY

2012 
African American Art in the 20th Century, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC
After Tanner: African American Artists since 1940, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA
To be a Lady: Forty-five Women in the Arts, 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery, New York, NY
Blues for Smoke, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from The David C. Driskell Center, organized by Smithsonian Institute of Traveling Exhibition Services (SITES), The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; Susquehanna Art Museum, Harrisburg, PA; Polk Museum of Art, Lakeland, FL; Figge Art Museum, Davenport, IA; The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture, Charlotte, NC; Taft Museum of Art, Cincinnati, OH
INsite/INchelsea: The Inaugural Exhibition, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY

2013
Abstract Expressionism / In Context: Seymour Lipton, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY
Regarding the Forces of Nature: From Alma Thomas to Yayoi Kusama, Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME

2014
Venus Drawn Out: 20th Century Drawings by Great Women Artists, The Armory Show Modern, New York, NY
Beyond the Spectrum: Abstraction in African American Art, 1950-1975, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY
RISING UP/UPRISING: Twentieth Century African American Art, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY
The Harmon & Harriet Kelley Collection of African American Art: Works on Paper, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA
African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond, Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA
Conversations: African and African American Artworks in Dialogue from the Collections of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art and Camille O. and William H. Cosby Jr., Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, Washington, DC
Prospect.3: Notes for Now, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA

2015
Represent: 200 Years of African American Art in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
America Is Hard to See, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Chromatic, Newark Museum, Newark, NJ
Collectors Legacy: Selections from the Sandra Lloyd Baccus Collection, The David C. Driskell Center at the University of Maryland, College Park, MD
Women and Abstraction, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL

2016
The Color Line: African American Artists and the Civil Rights in the United States, Musee du Quai Branly, Paris, France
Expansive Visions: GW Collections Past, Present, Future, George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, Washington, DC

2017
Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, Tate Modern, London, England