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Charles G. Shaw (1892-1974)


1 of 8

Untitled (Conductor), c.1934
oil on canvas
30" x 22", signed

Untitled (Biomorphic Abstraction), 1936
oil on canvas
16" x 20", signed and dated

Untitled (Intersecting Trapezoids No.2), c.1936
oil on canvasboard
18" x 15"

Untitled, 1940
oil on canvasboard
16" x 12", signed and dated

Untitled, 1940
oil on canvasboard
16" x 12", signed and dated

Untitled [MR56], 1942
oil on Masonite
22" x 30", signed and dated

Untitled (Atomic Flight), 1945
oil on canvasboard
22" x 30", signed

 

Start of The Race, 1948
oil on Masonite
30" x 22", signed and dated


Exhibitions


New & Noteworthy

Art in America, September 2008

by Gregory Galligan

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New York Times, December 20, 2007

by Roberta Smith

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MRG PRESS RELEASE

Charles G. Shaw

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Prints & Publications


Artist Information

“For honest painting, regardless of its representational or nonrepresentational merits, embraces certain patent fundamentals. One seeks, for example, rhythm, composition, spacial [sic] organization, design, progression of color, and many, many other qualities in any aesthetic work.[1]    

Born and raised in New York City, Charles Green Shaw grew up in an affluent home surrounded by books. He was an avid and early reader, and he also began drawing at the age of six. In his youth, Shaw was educated at Friends Seminary and the Berkeley School, and he took several trips to Europe with his family. After high school, he attended Yale University, graduating in 1914. He then went on to study architecture at Columbia University, but left after a year. When the United States entered World War I, Shaw enlisted in the army, spending eight months in England as a supply officer before receiving a commission for the new Army Air Corps. After eighteen months of service, Shaw was discharged and took up writing as a profession, contributing fiction and occasionally illustrations to such publications as Smart Set, The New Yorker, and Vanity Fair. A member of the “café society” that emerged in the 1920s in cosmopolitan cities like Paris and New York, Shaw was able to observe closely the world he documented in essays, plays, and novels. His circle of friends included H.L. Mencken and Cole Porter. An accomplished author by his early thirties, Shaw decided to study painting. He took classes with Thomas Hart Benton at the Art Students League, but it was the private lessons he took with George Luks from 1926 to 1928 that sparked Shaw’s passion for abstraction. In 1929, Shaw traveled to Paris, where he was exposed to two dominant forms of modernism at the time: cubism and biomorphic abstraction. He spent three years traveling in Europe, returning to the United States in 1932.

In 1933, inspired by what he had seen in Europe, Shaw began to develop his “plastic polygon” paintings, in which he would divide a polygon form into a broken pattern of rectangles. While the work may have been influenced by European modernism, it was also proudly local, inspired by the Manhattan skyline. The following year, the Valentine Gallery in New York City mounted Shaw's first solo exhibition. Titled Manhattan Patterns, the show featured these kaleidoscopic city interpretations and received favorable reviews. So impressed with Shaw’s work was A.E. Gallatin that in 1935, he broke his own rule against holding one-person shows at the Gallery of Living Art and mounted a Shaw exhibition.  As the press release explained, this exception was made “because of the important place Mr. Shaw now occupies among American abstract painters.”[2]

Shaw’s dedication to abstraction coincided with the ascendancy of social realism in the United States, when American artists working in abstract forms were sometimes disregarded as slavish imitators of European painting. As a writer and artist, Shaw labored intently to establish a foundation for abstract art in America. In 1936, he became an early member of the American Abstract Artists group (AAA), founded in 1936 by a group of painters and sculptors dedicated to promoting abstraction as a valid American art form. A vociferous critic of the failure of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) to include American abstractionists in its exhibitions, Shaw was invited to join its Advisory Board in 1936. He served as a member until 1941. In 1938, the AAA published a yearbook to coincide with its annual exhibition. Shaw served on the editorial board and wrote an essay defending abstraction, entitled “A Word to the Objector.” With wit, sarcasm, and insight, Shaw’s essay ran through and refuted the various criticisms lobbed at abstract painting and sculpture.[3]

In the 1940s, Shaw experimented with a variety of styles and media, making collages and assemblages, writing poems and children’s books, and creating paintings inspired by constructivism, neoplasticism, and biomorphic abstraction. But he was most enthusiastic about the emergence of abstract expressionism, stating to a friend his pride that “American art had finally ‘made it.’”[4] In 1947, he published It Looked Like Spilt Milk, a book introducing children to abstraction, which remains in print today. In the 1960s, Shaw abandoned gestural painting and began applying paint in a more controlled manner. His canvases grew larger in scale, and his bright, abstract forms seemed to synthesize the multiple styles at the time, including minimalism and pop art. His range of subject matter and dynamic approach to style have made him one of the most popular abstractionists of his time. His work can be found in major modern museums across the United States including the Museum of Modern Art (NYC), Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Art Institute of Chicago, and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.


[1] Charles Shaw, “A Word to the Objector,” American Abstract Artists 1938. Quoted in Susan Larsen, “The American Abstract Artists: A Documentary History 1936-1941,” Archives of American Art Journal, Vol. 14, No. 1 (1974), 4.

[2] “Charles G. Shaw Has One Man Exhibition at New York University's Gallery of Living Art,” New York University press release, April 27, 1935.

[3] See Larsen, “The American Abstract Artists,” 3-4.

[4] Charles H. Carpenter Jr., “The Odyssey of a Collector,” in Charles H. Carpenter: The Odyssey of a Collector (Pittsburgh, Pa.: Carnegie Museum of Art, 1996), 70. Quoted in Lisa Peters, “Impact, Movement, and Simplification: Paintings by Charles Green Shaw, 1966–70,” exhibition brochure, Spanierman Gallery, New York (February 23 to March 24, 2012), np.

 

SELECTED MUSEUM COLLECTIONS

Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA
Ackland Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Akron Museum of Art, Akron, OH
Alan R. Hite Art Institute, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA
The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD
Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA
Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA
Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, OH
The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
The Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH
Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO
Fort Worth Community Arts Center, Fort Worth, TX
Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, GA
Grey Art Gallery, New York University, New York, NY
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, New York, N
High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA
McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, TX
Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Le Musée de l’Art Moderne, Paris, France
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA
Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ
North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC
Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, AZ
Rhode Island School of Design Museum, Providence, RI
Rockefeller University, New York, NY
Saint Louis Art Museum, St. Louis, MO
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA
Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln, NE
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC
Syracuse University Art Museum, Syracuse, NY
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT
Weatherspoon Art Museum, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Wichita Art Museum, Wichita, KS
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT
 

1934
“Manhattan Patterns by Charles G. Shaw,” Valentine Gallery, New York, NY

1935
“Charles G. Shaw: Eight Abstract Paintings,” The Gallery of Living Art, New York, NY

1938
“Charles G. Shaw,” Valentine Gallery, New York, NY

1945
“Charles G. Shaw,” Passediot Gallery, New York, NY, April 16-28

1946
“Recent Works by Charles G. Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY

1949
“Charles G. Shaw,” American British Art Center, New York, NY

1950
“Recent Works: Charles Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY

1951
“Charles Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY

1952
“Recent Works: Charles Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY

1954
“Charles Shaw: Recent Paintings,” Kenneth Taylor Galleries
“Recent Paintings: Charles Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY

1956
“Charles Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY
“Charles Shaw: Recent Paintings,” Kenneth Taylor Galleries

1957
“Charles Shaw: Paintings” Passedoit Gallery, April 8-27 (exhibition brochure)
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1958
“Charles Shaw: Recent Oils,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1959
“Charles Shaw,” Passedoit Gallery
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1960
“Charles G. Shaw,” presented by Georgette Passedoit and Albert Landry, Albert Landry Galleries, New York, NY
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA
“Exhibition of Tempera Paintings by Charles Shaw,” Art Association of Newport, Newport, RI

1961
“Charles Shaw” presented by Georgett Passedoit and Albert Landry, Albert Landry Galleries, New York, NY
“Recent Paintings by Charles Shaw,” Theatre Workshop, Inc., New York, NY
“Charles Shaw,” Southampton Art Gallery, Southampton, MA
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1962
“Charles Shaw,” Southampton Art Gallery, Southampton, NY
“Paintings by Charles Shaw,” The Art Association of Newport, Newport, RI
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1963
“Charles Shaw: Recent Paintings,” Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, NY
“Shaw,” Alan R. Hite Institute, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA
“Shaw,” Bertha Schaeffer Gallery, New York, NY

1964
“Paintings by Charles Shaw,” Southampton Art Gallery, Southampton, NY
“Charles Shaw,” Galerie Scott-Faure, La Jolla, CA

1965
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1966
“Shaw,” Bertha Schaeffer Gallery, New York, NY
“Recent Paintings by Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell (Garden Studio Gallery), Nantucket, MA

1967
“Exhibition of Paintings by Centurion Charles G. Shaw,” The Century Association, New York, NY
“Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1968
“Charles Shaw: Paintings,” Bertha Schaeffer Gallery, New York, NY
“Recent Paintings by Charles Shaw,” E. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1969
“Recent Paintings by Charles Shaw,” The Home of Mrs. Kirk Haskell, Nantucket, MA

1971
“Charles Shaw,” Bertha Schaeffer Gallery, New York, NY

1973
“Charles Shaw,” Bertha Schaeffer Gallery, New York, NY

1975
“The Memorial Show of Work by Charles Green Shaw,” The Century Club, New York, NY
“Charles Shaw: Works from 1935 to 1942,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1976
“Montages by Charles G. Shaw: Playing Card Collages and Boxes,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1979
“Reliefs by Charles G. Shaw: Relief Sculptures in Wood from 1937-1938,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1982
“Charles G. Shaw: Paintings from the 1930s,”
Washburn Gallery, New York, NY
“Charles G. Shaw: Paintings from the 1960s,” Washburn Gallery, 113 Greene Street, New York, NY

1983
“Charles G. Shaw: Playing Card Montages,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1985
“Charles Green Shaw: Paintings: 1930-1942,”
Helander Gallery, Palm Beach, FL

1987
“Charles G. Shaw: Abstractions of the Thirties,” Richard York Gallery, New York, NY

1988
“Charles G. Shaw: Biomorphic Dimensions,”
Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1989
“Charles G. Shaw: Vintage Playing Card Montages,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1991
“Charles G. Shaw: Works from the 1930s and 1940s,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1997
“Charles G. Shaw,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY
“Charles G. Shaw,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

2007
“Charles G. Shaw,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY
 

1935
“Modern American Art in Modern Room Settings,” Modernage, New York, NY
“Thirteenth Annual Spring Salon,” The American Art Association, Anderson Galleries, Inc., New York, NY
“Exhibition: An American Group,” Valentine Gallery, New York, NY
The Gallery of Living Art, New York University, New York, NY
College Art Association, New York, NY
Paul Reinhardt Galleries, New York, NY
Galerie de Paris, Paris, France
Society of Independent Artists, New York, NY

1936
“Five Contemporary American Concretionists: Biederman, Calder, Ferren, Morris, and Shaw,” (curated by A.E. Gallatin) presented by The Gallery of Living Art at the Paul Reinhardt Galleries, New York, NY; exhibition travels to Galerie Pierre, Paris, France; Mayer Gallery, London, UK
“Salons of America,” American Art Association-Anderson Galleries, New York, NY, March
Yale Club, New York, NY
Independent Artist’s Exhibition, New York, NY
Paul Reinhardt Galleries, New York, NY
Modern Age, New York, NY

1937
“Frelinghuysen, Gallatin, Morris, Shaw,” Paul Reinhardt Galleries, New York, NY
“The First Annual: American Abstract Artist Exhibition,” Squibb Gallery, New York, NY

1938
“Oeuvres Recentes de Gallatin, Morris, Shaw,”
Galerie Pierre, Paris, France
“2nd Annual: American Abstract Artists,” New York, NY; exhibition traveled (catalogue)
The Newport Art Association, Newport, RI
Shell-Mex Poster Exhibition, London, England
San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, CA

1939
“Recent Paintings by Gallatin, Morris, Shaw,” Jacques Seligmann & Co., New York, NY
“American Abstract Artists,” Riverside Museum, New York, NY, March 7-26

1940
“Recent Paintings and Construction by Gallatin, Morris, Shaw,” The Arts Club of Chicago, Chicago, IL
“American Abstract Art,” assembled by Mr. Stephen Lion, Galerie St. Etienne, New York, NY
Museum of Non-Objective Art, New York, NY

1941
Museum of Non-Objective Art, New York, NY

1945
“Painting in the United States,” Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (SIAA)
“Eight by Eight: American Abstract Painting Since 1940,” (organized by A.E. Gallatin), Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA (catalogue)
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting,” Whitney Museum of American Art New York, NY (catalogue)

1947
“3rd Summer Exhibition of Contemporary Art,” The State University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, (catalogue)
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

1948
“Contemporary Illustrations of Children’s Books,” Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA (exhibition brochure)
“The Sixth Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Paintings,” The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond, VA (catalogue)
American Abstract Artist Exhibition, Chinese Gallery Limited, New York, NY

1949
“13th Annual Exhibition: American Abstract Artists,” Riverside Museum, New York, NY
“Salon des Realites Nouvelles,” Paris, France (catalogue)

1950
“14th Exhibition of American Abstract Artists,” New School for Social Research, New York, NY
“Salon des Realties Nouvelles,” Palais des Beaux-Arts, Paris, France (catalogue)
“Linien,” Galerie Linien, Copenhagen, Denmark

1951
“Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America,”
Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY (catalogue)
“15th Annual Exhibition: American Abstract Artists: Exhibition of Works of Abstract Artists of Three Nations, British, Danish, American Abstract Artists,” Riverside Museum, New York, NY
“Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture by Members of the New York Chapter of Artists Equity Association,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

1952
“American Abstract Artists: Sixteenth Annual,” New Gallery, New York, NY

1953
“Memorial Exhibition of 17 Paintings by A.E. Gallatin and the 17th Annual Exhibition of the American Abstract Artists,” Artists Equity Association, New York, NY
“Annual Exhibition of Sculpture Watercolors, Drawings,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY (catalogue)
“International Watercolor Exhibition, 17th Biennial,” Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
“Annual Spring Exhibition: Abstract American Artists,” Hacker Gallery, New York, NY

1954
“18th Annual, American Abstract Artists,” Riverside Museum, New York, NY
“Oils: by Members of the American Abstract Artists’ Group,” Otis Library, Otis, MA

1955
“Work in Progress: Charles Shaw, Joseph Hirsch and Abraham Rattner,” The Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI
“Fourteenth Annual Exhibition of The Federation,” Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, Associated American Artists Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)
“Nebraska Art Association Sixth-Fifth Annual Exhibition,” University Galleries, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE; exhibition traveled to Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE (catalogue)
“19th Annual, American Abstract Artists,” Riverside Museum, New York, NY
“John Myers Presents: 30 Artists Equity Members,” Gallery 21, New York, NY
“Gallery Highlights: Part II,” Passedoit Gallery, New York, NY

1956
“Annual Exhibition: Paintings, Sculpture, Watercolors & Drawings,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

1957
“Peintres Americains Contemporains” Musée Galliera, Paris, France
“75 Living American Artists,” an exhibition organized by the United States Committee of the International Association of Plastic Arts, Inc., sponsored by L’Association Francaise d’Action Artistique and the United States Information Agency, exhibition toured Europe including Munich and Bonn, Germany; Lille, Marseilles, Paris, Tours, Toulouse and Rouen, France
“Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors,” Cha­tham College, Pittsburgh, PA

1960
“Society for Contemporary American Art Annual Exhibition XX and 20th Anniversary Exhibit,” The Art Institute of Chicago
“Collage,” Gallery Mayer, New York, NY

1961
“Painting,” Art at 410 Park Avenue, Chase Manhattan Bank, New York, NY
“International Avant-Garde Perspectives: The Americas, North & South, Europe,” The Art Association of Newport, Newport, RI
“Collectors Choice / 2,” The Saint Paul Gallery and School of Art, Saint Paul, MN
“Corcoran Gallery Biennial,” Corcoran Gallery, Washington, DC

1962
“Geometric Abstraction in America,” Fifth Loan Exhibition, Friends of the Whitney Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY(catalogue)
“26th Annual American Abstract Artists Exhibition,” IBM Gallery, New York, NY (exhibition brochure)
“Selected Paintings: T. Frost, J. Girona, B. Green, W. Kamys, N. Narotzky, N. Raisen, J. Sanders, C. Shaw, Tania; Sculpture by W. Behl,” Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, NY

1963
“22nd Annual Exhibition, Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors,” Lever House, New York, NY (catalogue)
“Five Americans,” Foothill College, Los Altos, CA
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY (catalogue)
Century Association, New York, NY
University of West Virginia, Morgantown, WV
State University College, Buffalo, NY

1964
Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL
“23rd Annual: Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors,” Lever House, New York, NY
Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, IN
“Collage: Five Nationalities by Painters & Sculptors,” Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, NY
“American Abstract Artists,” Loeb Art Center, New York University, New York, NY

1965
“29th Annual Exhibition of Members and Guests,” American Abstract Artists, Riverside Museum, New York, NY
“Federation of Modern Painters & Sculptors,” Lever House, New York, NY
J. Walter Thompson Co., New York, NY

1966
“25th Annual Exhibition: Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors,” Union Carbide Corporation, New York, NY
“American Abstract Artists: 1936-1966,” Riverside Museum, New York, NY
Art in the Embassies Program of United States Department of State, Washington, DC
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia, PA
University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

1968
“Centurions Associated with the Art Students League,” The Century Association, New York, NY (catalogue)
“HEMISFAIR ’68,” 1968 World’s Fair, San Antonio, TX

1969
“Tenth Anniversary Exhibition: Recent Trends in American Art,” The Westmoreland County Museum of Art, Greenburg, PA

1970
“Federation of Modern Paintings and Sculptors Exhibition,” Loeb Student Center, New York University, New York, NY

1972
“American Geometric Abstraction / 1930s,” Zabriskie Gallery, New York, NY
“Museum of Non-Objective Paintings,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1975
“Eight by Eight,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)

1976
“American Abstract Artists Exhibition in Honor of Josef Albers, George L.K. Morris, I. Rice Pereira, Charles Shaw,” Westbeth, NY

1979
“c.1910-1950,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1980
“Meisterwerke des XX Jarhunderts, Eine Schweizer Sammlung, Moderner Kunst, 1909-1939,” Kunstmuseum Winterthur, Bern, Switzerland

1983
“Beyond the Plane: Constructions in America 1930-65,” New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, NJ; exhibition traveled to University of Maryland Art Gallery; Detroit Institute of Arts
“American Art of the 1930s: Selections from the Collection of the Whitney Museum,” Whitney Museum of American Art, Fairfield, CT

1984 
“Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America, 1927-1944,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
“Print Acquisitions: 1974-1984,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1986 
“Fifty Years Ago: W.P.A./A.A.A.,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY
“A.E. Gallatin and Others,” Grey Art Gallery, New York University, New York (catalogue)
“Modern Times: Aspects of American Art, 1907-1956,” Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Inc., New York, NY (catalogue)

1987
“Progressive Geometric Abstraction in America 1934-1955,” Fred L. Emerson Gallery, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY; exhibition traveled to Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, MA, Terra Museum of American Art,  Chicago, IL; Fisher Gallery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (catalogue)
“Generations of Geometry,” Whitney Museum of American Art at Equitable Center, New York, NY

1988
“New York Cubists: Works by A.E. Gallatin, George L.K. Morris, and Charles Shaw from the Thirties and Forties,” Hirschl & Adler Galleries Inc., New York, NY (catalogue)

1989
“C.1939 (New York Worlds Fair),” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY
Washburn Gallery, New York, NY
“The Patricia and Phillip Frost Collection: American Abstraction, 1930-1945,” National Museum of American Art and Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

1990
“In Review: Bolotowsky, Mason, Scarlett, Shaw,” Washburn Gallery New York, NY
“American Abstract Artists,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY
“Under Five,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1991
“Between Mondrian and Minimalism: Neo-Plasticism in America,” The Whitney Museum of American Art, Downtown at Federal Reserve Plaza, New York, NY
“The Second Wave: American Abstraction of the 1930s and 1940s, Selections from the Penny and Elton Yasuna Collection,” Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA; exhibition traveled to the Samuel P. Harn Museum, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL; Delaware Art Museum, Wilmington, DE
“Modern American Painting 1925-1950,” Snyder Fine Art, New York, NY (catalogue)
“Circle and Square: Geometric Abstraction and Constructivism in the Americas, 1934-1950,” Kouros Gallery, New York, NY

1992
“Gifts and Acquisitions in Context,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
“Parallel Vision,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
“The Geometric Tradition in American Art, 1930-90,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
“Fables, Fantasies and Everyday Things,” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY

1993
“The Uses of Geometry: Then and Now” Snyder
Fine Art, New York, NY(catalogue)
“Aspects of American Abstraction, 1930-1942,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY,  (catalogue)

1994
“Counterpoints: American Art, 1930-1945,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)
“Top Flight: Group Show,” Washburn Gallery, New York, NY

1995
“1937 - American Abstract Art,” Snyder Fine Art, New York, NY (catalogue)

1996
“Charles H. Carpenter, Jr: The Odyssey of a Collector,” Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA; exhibition traveled to Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
“Abstraction Across America, 1934-1946,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)

1998
“Defining the Edge: Early American Abstraction, Selections from the Collection of Dr. Peter B. Fischer,” Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, CA; exhibition traveled to Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)
“American Abstract Art of the 1930s and 1940s: The J. Donald Nichols Collection,” Wake Forest University Fine Arts Gallery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC

2001
“Modern American Art of the 1930s and 40s,” Gary Snyder Fine Art, New York, NY

2002
“Austere Geometry (1955-1975) & Modern American Masterworks (1930-1945),” Gary Snyder Fine Art, New York, NY
“Early American Abstraction: Small Scale, Large Dimension,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)
“New York Abstraction 1930-1945,” Gary Snyder Fine Art, New York, NY

2003
“The Park Avenue Cubists: Gallatin, Morris, Frelinghuysen and Shaw,” The Grey Art Gallery, New York University, New York, NY; exhibition traveled to The Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA
“The 1940s: Modern American Art & Design,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)
“The Transatlantic Avant-Garde: American Artists in Paris, 1918-1939,” Musee d’Art Americain, Giverny, France; exhibition traveled to Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, WA; Terra Museum of American Art, Chicago, IL
“Modern American Art 1930-1975,” Gary Snyder Fine Art, New York, NY

2004
“The 1930s: Modern American Art & Design,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY (catalogue)
“Breaking Boundaries: Early American Abstraction, 1930-1945,” Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York, NY

2005
“Evolution in Abstraction: Antecedents and Descendents,” D. Wigmore Fine Art, Inc. (catalogue)

2006
“Geometric Abstraction: Two Generations,” D. Wigmore Fine Art, Inc (catalogue)

2010
The Shape of Abstraction, Boston University Art Gallery, Boston, MA
Constructive Spirit: Abstract Art in South and North America, 1920s–1950s, Newark Museum, Newark, NJ

2012
Encounters with the 1930’s, Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Spain
INsite/INchelsea: The Inaugural Exhibition, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY